Sick students should get rest

It is December, and there are a million things to prepare, to study, and to stress over. In the midst of writing an essay, a drop lands on the keyboard. Soon there is a runny nose, then a waterfall of snot and more snot. The cough hacks its way through, reducing voices to hoarse whispers. Lastly, the fever burns through and succeeds in keeping the patient at home or at least it thinks it does.

The fever doesn’t convince the student and the affected leaves the warm comfort of home, heading to the frolic ground of viruses that is school. The sick spreads the sickness to others. It is a vicious cycle that can be stopped by staying at home, which is a simple solution to an old problem. There are many factors as to why people go to school when feeling ill. Students are afraid of missing school and falling behind. For senior students especially, this can become a dilemma as catching up is harder and grades are more important.

Staff have similar concerns about absences from school to recover from illness. They do not want to leave their students to someone who may not fully understand classroom expectations and rules. They feel just as responsible for their classrooms as students feel about their work. Resting at home may feel like work is piling up when doing nothing. But when a person is sick, doing nothing is the best medicine of all. Stress will only aggravate illness.

Concentration becomes harder when the body is occupied with fighting disease. Imagine trying to listen and write notes with a runny nose that needs to be wiped. For teachers, trying to lecture with a headache is no fun either. Here is where resting at home is a better option than being tired and spreading illness around the school.

However, there is a catch. To fully facilitate disease free learning, students and teachers must work together to ensure that staying home is the best and only option.

When illness strikes, students should report their absence to the office. This will ensure that teachers know the student is not “skipping.” Furthermore, they should also communicate with their teachers through email in accordance with teachers’ policies made clear at the beginning of the semester.

When the student returns, they are responsible for catching up to the class. Usually, asking for notes or class information from peers is a good idea. CL is also highly useful. Teachers also have a role in helping their students catch up. Having a way for students to access notes and other class materials will relieve teacher and student stress.

The digital literacy program has already simplified communication by using Microsoft Office apps. Alternatively, some teachers use apps like Edmodo. The math department has an assignment package with daily homework. Notes are always accessible through individual math teacher’s websites.

It is also not fair when teachers draft up another harder version of the test to give to students that miss test day. If students are sick enough to stay at home, then they are most likely not studying.

The result of teamwork will raise students’ motivation to catch up, as it becomes easier when classroom material is made accessible at home. Students and teachers can all do their part to spread empathy and compassion around illness absences.

The digital literacy program has already simplified communication by using Microsoft Office apps. Alternatively, some teachers use apps like Edmodo. The math department has an assignment package with daily homework. Notes are always accessible through individual math teacher’s websites.

It is also not fair when teachers draft up another harder version of the test to give to students that miss test day. If students are sick enough to stay at home, then they are most likely not studying.

The result of teamwork will raise students’ motivation to catch up, as it becomes easier when classroom material is made accessible at home. Students and teachers can all do their part to spread empathy and compassion around illness absences.